New work featured by INSPIRARE - Check out the full editorial on their website www.inspirare.com

"L’équilibre Fragile"

Photography & Styling - Paige Campbell Linden

Hair & Makeup - Sarah Shimkus

Model- Kyla Morency

New work featured by INSPIRARE - Check out the full editorial on their website www.inspirare.com

"L’équilibre Fragile"

Photography & Styling - Paige Campbell Linden

Hair & Makeup - Sarah Shimkus 

Model- Kyla Morency

New work featured by INSPIRARE - Check out the full editorial on their website www.inspirare.com

"L’équilibre Fragile"

Photography & Styling - Paige Campbell Linden

Hair & Makeup - Sarah Shimkus

Model- Kyla Morency

New work featured by INSPIRARE - Check out the full editorial on their website www.inspirare.com

"L’équilibre Fragile"

Photography & Styling - Paige Campbell Linden

Hair & Makeup - Sarah Shimkus

Model- Kyla Morency

venezya:

100sss:

#celine

(via
TumbleOn
)

venezya:

100sss:

#celine

(via
TumbleOn
)

(via flo-flo-flo)

Thursday night scan - time to edit ‘/ #bzzz #fujifilm #instaxmini

(Source: cybergus, via meandmy69cats)

(Source: Spotify)

untrustyou:

Kotama Bouabane

untrustyou:

Kotama Bouabane

(via nastily)

what-do-i-wear:

SAINT LAURENT
Stretch-silk georgette soft-cup triangle bra
$690

what-do-i-wear:

SAINT LAURENT

Stretch-silk georgette soft-cup triangle bra

$690

(via vinylsandnoir)

(Source: prismenoirinspirations, via teethmagazine)

blackhallmanor:

Ann Demeulemeester interview. encens magazine no 18 fall/winter 2006/2007
How would you describe your evolution during these last twenty years of fashion? Usually I say that a new collection is the concrete expression of everything that was missing in those that came before. Its like a steep hill that i have to climb. In twenty years, I’ve gradually scratched a furrow, the story of which, my story, is clothing. I’ve gotten better, I’ve acquired technical experience that allows me to go farther but i never stop learning
For two seasons, women’s and men’s have been shown together, but now they’re broken down into two distinct collections. Has that created any new possibilities for you? Absolutely. For a long time, I didn’t want to separate men’s and women’s. I didn’t think it was normal, it was like cutting life in two. Certainly, the necessity of making them walk separately is a response to my need for enlarging the scale of pieces available for men. But this is where i found happiness. Everything is not blended like it was before. It’s no longer a question of doing a jacket for women in the morning, and in the afternoon concentrating on men’s trousers. Now I work in two stages, beginning first with men’s, which leads me to undertake the women’s collection under another light, as if it were the second chapter of the same story. I believe that this different approach to my fashion can be seen in the final result.
When you began in 1987, your eminence grise, your world’s alter ego, Patryck Robyn, put together some sumptuous visuals. Why have you stopped doing it that way? There was no longer any reason. At the beginning of my career, I resisted the idea of a show. I thought that I absolutely wasn’t ready. To compensate for this, with Patrick, who was still a full time photographer, I produced catalogues of my collections. Then Patrick got more involved in the evolution of my label, to the point that at a certain point it seemed to us that, in order to keep together as a couple we needed to regroup our ambitions into one. Patrick had to do a lot of traveling and was sometimes absent for long periods. One day he decided to stop short when it came to leading a double life so that he could work with me. I’ll always be grateful for that.
What is your relationship to your past, your archives? Out of fear of disappointing myself, I’ve always refused to look back. But i have kept a lot of pieces that i considered the best of each of my collections from being sold. It has built into an enormous stock, which i keep in a separate room. However, the for the last months, my retrospective at Hyeres has required that i refresh my memory. Despite my apprehension, revisiting my career had been quite thrilling. Certain clothes haven’t aged at all. I could do them tomorrow without a problem. What are the most lasting, in the end, are the memories, flashes: I can rediscover my tears in a piece of clothing! 
In your winter 2007 show, big hoods that can be wrapped around the body reminded me of a great moment in the fashion you’ve done. Were they directly inspired by your 1997 rectangles for wrapping around the body? My mentality’s different than it was ten years ago. In 1997, for the first time I wanted to set the counters back to zero and envision my collection as it I knew nothing. I worked without sketches without any bosses. All that was left was the material, the fabric. As if I no longer had any knowledge about clothing design, I made it move over me, I rolled myself into it and i put holes in it to stick my arms through it. It was a very strong experience, which will haunt my sense of fashion for life. Also that piece has become my emblem: at the workshop, my collaborators call it <the ann piece>. So yes, maybe this season more than the others is a prolongation of my research on clothing pure of all construction. But in the meantime, there has been ten years designing cuts, and my way of working feels the effect of it. For me, the guiding principle remains trying to explore unknown territory for each collection, but not confronting things that aren’t part of my sensibility. I’m always excited by the idea of starting with an element that I find ugly a priori and then transforming it in terms of my lexicon. The result makes me learn a lot about myself.
How have you been affected by your passion for Belgian fashion? I knew that it was going to pass. When I started, Antwerp was a no-man’s land, no journalist was interested in us. Then a wave of designers started making waves, almost to the rhythm of each new season, which helped to crystallize the phenomenon. Signs of enthusiasm from the press was very gratifying, to the extent that Belgium finally became synonymous with fashion. That said, I’ve always kept 
Leather is essential to your collections. How have you succeeded in always finding treatments of it? I love leather, working with it is a permanent challenge. Cutting it doesn’t allow for the slightest approximation: you have to treat it with perfect mastery. I designed my first clothing in leather in 1993, a jacket that i still wear. The idea came to me from my brother who was working with sheepskin, and who initiated me to the countless textures that leather can engender. In addition, I quickly got alienated from my existing materials when it came to creating my own touches, as i experimented with novel qualities of the skins, which I love approaching like living tissue.
Would you live without making fashion your profession? That’s difficult to answer. I was only a teenager when i registered at the Academy at Antwerp, and I was more preoccupied with the world of music than that of fashion magazines. I was already ill at ease with the <chi chi> side of this profession. My girlfriends, who thought I was an astonishing phenomenon, strutted around in a Mugler look and Maud Frizon shoes. I needed some time to understand that i could appreciate a leather jacket by Montana without loving all fashion and being bound to reject it as a whole.
The obstinacy that characterizes you, did you have it then? Perhaps my decision to temporarily interrupt my career so that I could have a baby was also a form of stubbornness. Victor was born when I became conscious that I really wanted to make fashion my profession. His birth seemed to me essential before actually taking off, and there was no way in the world that I would have accepted letting time fly at the expense of my desire to have a child.
Do you follow the collections of other designers? Honestly, the feat of letting myself be influenced blocks me. I live a bit in my own bubble and concentrate in my own evolution. Of course, I see things but i dont pass my days trying to decipher them. Besides I have a closer relations with people in the arts or music than those in the fashion world. But I’m still very respectful of my peers, whose high standards give their creations soul. Even if they aren’t my taste, I’m the first to recognize their value.

blackhallmanor:

Ann Demeulemeester interview. encens magazine no 18 fall/winter 2006/2007

How would you describe your evolution during these last twenty years of fashion? Usually I say that a new collection is the concrete expression of everything that was missing in those that came before. Its like a steep hill that i have to climb. In twenty years, I’ve gradually scratched a furrow, the story of which, my story, is clothing. I’ve gotten better, I’ve acquired technical experience that allows me to go farther but i never stop learning

For two seasons, women’s and men’s have been shown together, but now they’re broken down into two distinct collections. Has that created any new possibilities for you? Absolutely. For a long time, I didn’t want to separate men’s and women’s. I didn’t think it was normal, it was like cutting life in two. Certainly, the necessity of making them walk separately is a response to my need for enlarging the scale of pieces available for men. But this is where i found happiness. Everything is not blended like it was before. It’s no longer a question of doing a jacket for women in the morning, and in the afternoon concentrating on men’s trousers. Now I work in two stages, beginning first with men’s, which leads me to undertake the women’s collection under another light, as if it were the second chapter of the same story. I believe that this different approach to my fashion can be seen in the final result.

When you began in 1987, your eminence grise, your world’s alter ego, Patryck Robyn, put together some sumptuous visuals. Why have you stopped doing it that way? There was no longer any reason. At the beginning of my career, I resisted the idea of a show. I thought that I absolutely wasn’t ready. To compensate for this, with Patrick, who was still a full time photographer, I produced catalogues of my collections. Then Patrick got more involved in the evolution of my label, to the point that at a certain point it seemed to us that, in order to keep together as a couple we needed to regroup our ambitions into one. Patrick had to do a lot of traveling and was sometimes absent for long periods. One day he decided to stop short when it came to leading a double life so that he could work with me. I’ll always be grateful for that.

What is your relationship to your past, your archives? Out of fear of disappointing myself, I’ve always refused to look back. But i have kept a lot of pieces that i considered the best of each of my collections from being sold. It has built into an enormous stock, which i keep in a separate room. However, the for the last months, my retrospective at Hyeres has required that i refresh my memory. Despite my apprehension, revisiting my career had been quite thrilling. Certain clothes haven’t aged at all. I could do them tomorrow without a problem. What are the most lasting, in the end, are the memories, flashes: I can rediscover my tears in a piece of clothing! 

In your winter 2007 show, big hoods that can be wrapped around the body reminded me of a great moment in the fashion you’ve done. Were they directly inspired by your 1997 rectangles for wrapping around the body? My mentality’s different than it was ten years ago. In 1997, for the first time I wanted to set the counters back to zero and envision my collection as it I knew nothing. I worked without sketches without any bosses. All that was left was the material, the fabric. As if I no longer had any knowledge about clothing design, I made it move over me, I rolled myself into it and i put holes in it to stick my arms through it. It was a very strong experience, which will haunt my sense of fashion for life. Also that piece has become my emblem: at the workshop, my collaborators call it <the ann piece>. So yes, maybe this season more than the others is a prolongation of my research on clothing pure of all construction. But in the meantime, there has been ten years designing cuts, and my way of working feels the effect of it. For me, the guiding principle remains trying to explore unknown territory for each collection, but not confronting things that aren’t part of my sensibility. I’m always excited by the idea of starting with an element that I find ugly a priori and then transforming it in terms of my lexicon. The result makes me learn a lot about myself.

How have you been affected by your passion for Belgian fashion? I knew that it was going to pass. When I started, Antwerp was a no-man’s land, no journalist was interested in us. Then a wave of designers started making waves, almost to the rhythm of each new season, which helped to crystallize the phenomenon. Signs of enthusiasm from the press was very gratifying, to the extent that Belgium finally became synonymous with fashion. That said, I’ve always kept 

Leather is essential to your collections. How have you succeeded in always finding treatments of it? I love leather, working with it is a permanent challenge. Cutting it doesn’t allow for the slightest approximation: you have to treat it with perfect mastery. I designed my first clothing in leather in 1993, a jacket that i still wear. The idea came to me from my brother who was working with sheepskin, and who initiated me to the countless textures that leather can engender. In addition, I quickly got alienated from my existing materials when it came to creating my own touches, as i experimented with novel qualities of the skins, which I love approaching like living tissue.

Would you live without making fashion your profession? That’s difficult to answer. I was only a teenager when i registered at the Academy at Antwerp, and I was more preoccupied with the world of music than that of fashion magazines. I was already ill at ease with the <chi chi> side of this profession. My girlfriends, who thought I was an astonishing phenomenon, strutted around in a Mugler look and Maud Frizon shoes. I needed some time to understand that i could appreciate a leather jacket by Montana without loving all fashion and being bound to reject it as a whole.

The obstinacy that characterizes you, did you have it then? Perhaps my decision to temporarily interrupt my career so that I could have a baby was also a form of stubbornness. Victor was born when I became conscious that I really wanted to make fashion my profession. His birth seemed to me essential before actually taking off, and there was no way in the world that I would have accepted letting time fly at the expense of my desire to have a child.

Do you follow the collections of other designers? Honestly, the feat of letting myself be influenced blocks me. I live a bit in my own bubble and concentrate in my own evolution. Of course, I see things but i dont pass my days trying to decipher them. Besides I have a closer relations with people in the arts or music than those in the fashion world. But I’m still very respectful of my peers, whose high standards give their creations soul. Even if they aren’t my taste, I’m the first to recognize their value.

(via pivovaroward)

Go- Getter | #gogetter

Go- Getter | #gogetter

(Source: highqualityfashion, via pivovaroward)

skt4ng:

Julius S/S 2015 | Photography by Quentin Saunier via Novembre Magazine

skt4ng:

Julius S/S 2015 | Photography by Quentin Saunier via Novembre Magazine

(via skt4ng)

labsinthe:

Angela Lindvall for Chanel F/W 2001 shot by Karl Lagerfeld

(via pivovaroward)